Does It Really Matter What We Eat?

How much do we really need to eat? What kinds of foods provide the best fuel for our bodies?  How do we know?

A year ago, Andrew did an excellent series about metabolic syndrome.  In part 3, he mentioned a book, which I bought.  Like many books, The Insulin-Resistance Diet has a could this be you? list:

A family history of diabetes, overweight problems, abnormal cholesterol or triglycerides, heart disease, or stroke.  yes, yes, yes, yes, and yes

Frequent cravings for sweet or salty, crunchy snack food. no – well, unless you count and skittles and pralines, and… okay, maybe that’s a yes

This was not a happy beginning to the list, but I continued, and before long said, “Wait! How many ‘yes’ answers do you need before this is something to be concerned about?”  Well, it turns out the answer is three, and when I finished the risk-test, I had a whopping thirteen yesses!  Most depressing.  It could, however, explain why all my clothes seem to have shrunk (and I can’t blame prednisone this time).

What struck me when reading the book were the similarities between this diet and the Zone. The Zone, in turn, has some similarities to Atkins.  The biggest distinction between Insulin Resistance Diet and the others is that there are no restrictions on what can be eaten.  You can eat whatever you want as long as you have protein every time you eat.  With Atkins, by the second day people are climbing the walls with cravings for a piece of fruit or glass of orange juice.

After reading The Insulin-Resistance Diet, I re-read Dr. Atkins New Diet Revolution and Barry Sears’ The Zone: A Revolutionary Life Plan to Put Your Body in Total Balance for Permanent Weight Loss.  I own these because I inherited them from my father, who died of a heart attack at age 59.

As I continued looking for more information, I discovered Sears’ follow-up:  The Anti-Inflammation Zone, and a book by neurologist David Perlmutter: Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar–Your Brain’s Silent Killers.

These books all subscribe to a very different nutritional theory than the USDA and NHS.

NutritionTheoriesGovernment recommendations are that people should consume a significant amount of grains.  Really?  When we fatten up our cows for slaughter (the butcher will be here in a week), we bring them in off pasture and feed them lots of grain.  It should not surprise anyone that a diet rich in grains leads to weight gain — in people as well as cows.

How do we choose which theory to believe?  Lots of grains or no grains?  How do we know the best way to eat?  One thing I did was to look at credentials and motivation.

  • Dr. Atkins was a cardiologist who had spectacular results getting his patients to lose a lot of weight quickly.  Contrary to popular misconception, he only advocated extremely low carbs during the induction phase of his diet.  Long-term, his lifetime eating plan is quite similar to the carbs recommended by both Sears and Perlmutter.
  • Barry Sears is a well-respected researcher who comes from a family in which the men all die of heart attacks in their 50’s; he was searching for the truth to prolong his own life, not dabbling around in the lab looking to support the pet theory of his financier.
  • Dr. Perlmutter is a neurologist who found a common thread between diet and metabolism; he has helped patients with a variety of ailments, and refers to a number of credible studies in explaining the affect of food on our health. Lustig, Phinney & Volek  have similar work that is cited by Dr. Perlmutter.
  • The nutritionist and physician who wrote Insulin-Resistance Diet have helped people lose weight after all other diets failed them.

Those are all much better credentials than a theory based on research done to prove that a vegetarian diet is superior to any other — which (rumor has it) is where the food pyramid came from.  What if the government quit subsidizing wheat, corn, and soy farming, and started subsidizing green beans, lettuce, and spinach? Would that lead to a change in the USDA’s dietary recommendations?

It’s interesting to compare these theories.  What’s the same?  What’s different? What will work?

Zone and IRD both recommend consuming protein and carbohydrates in specific proportions.  7 g protein to 9 g carbohydrate for the Zone, and 7g protein to 15 g carb in IRD.

PCFZone

Atkins takes a slightly different approach, claiming that people whose diet has been drastically out of balance due to overconsumption of starchy foods and under-consumption of protein ought to compensate by first eating plenty of protein and no starchy foods; then, as excess weight comes off, increase healthy carbs to a more appropriate balance between carbs and protein.  Grain Brain, too, starts out recommending very low carbs, then increases after a month

All of these dietary plans reach the same conclusion:  It does matter what we eat.  To be healthy, people need to eat the right foods in the right proportions.

The reason this matters is something that I will elaborate on in a future post. Sears & Perlmutter are both adamant that there is a link between diet and autoimmune diseases.

To be continued

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One thought on “Does It Really Matter What We Eat?

  1. Having all those same ‘yes’ answers in my column, I am really appreciative of this post. My labs come back borderline or pre-diabetic so I love the analysis you’ve done. I’ll take a look into the book/diet you recommend. I certainly need to do something different than what I’m doing (which is obviously eating incorrectly and taking too many drugs to correct it …)

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