sometimes I hate my pharmacy

Sixty-three.

My family filled sixty-three prescriptions last year.

This might explain why one of the pharmacy techs greets me by name, regardless of what city we’re in when we see one another.  It must be time to ask for her schedule, because I am really aggravated dealing with a couple of the other people who work there.

It’s convenient to phone in my refill requests (it would be even better if I could do it online).  I call the day before my doctor’s appointment so that the prescriptions will be ready when I leave the doctor – and, if there are any changes, it’s easy to drop off the new paper and wait while they add one more bottle to my bag.

Last week I phoned for refills on Tuesday.  Wednesday I saw the rheumy then went to the pharmacy to pick up my refills and drop off the Enbrel prescription.  Thursday I was at the PCP’s office, then dropped off another prescription at the pharmacy (saying that I’d pick it up when I picked up the Enbrel).  I also wanted to ask about the EnbrelSupport program, but there was an intern working who didn’t have a clue about anything; he took my card and stuck it with my prescription (I sorta thought he’d just slide it through the card reader and give it back to me).  I was in a hurry, so decided to sort it all out later.

Later arrived today.  My favorite tech was working but she couldn’t find any prescriptions for me.  Turns out that last week’s intern never entered it in the computer.  He just stuck the written script into a bag with my Enbrel script and card.  sigh

My Enbrel was approved!  They didn’t have it ready for me, but it was approved.  I arranged to go to the rheumatologist first (deserving of it’s own post), then return for my prescriptions.  Both of them.

Back to the pharmacy.  Tech was helping someone, so the pharmacist came up.  She rang up my prescriptions (and an ice chest with two bags of frozen peas to keep the rx cold on my way home) and wanted $57.  Gulp.  I’d estimated $25-30.  I asked if they’d run the Enbrel card (after all, they’d had it for four days).  The pharmacist wandered away and the tech came up and fixed everything.

Then I checked my prescription – the other one.  Wrong dose; I take 300mg – this says 240 (and I forgot to photograph the prescription, so I can’t look).  Plus it says auto-refill.  Which I hate.  So I asked.  The tech noticed that it was a different dose than I usually get, but that’s what my PCP wrote this time.  And since the pharmacist had been there talking to me, one would think she would have done the new prescription counselling.  No.

I just paid and left.  I’m too tired of dealing with everything to care right now.

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