when “yes” means “no”

When a toddler asks, “Can I have another vitamin?” your options are limited.  “No. More than one per day would be  bad for you,” results in tears.  Sometimes kids just aren’t mature enough to understand.  Changing the response to, “Yes.  You can have another one tomorrow,” leads to a happy, healthy child.

Sure, kids need to learn to accept “no” as an answer, but when they’re young, it’s possible to get the point across more effectively by saying “yes” followed by a little teaching.  There’s nothing wrong with dealing with things in an age-appropriate manner.  As the child matures, understanding develops and the question is no longer asked.  Eventually they learn to accept “no” gracefully.

Recently Edwin Leap wrote a column titled Attention Doctors! People May Not Like You!  and if you wonder about the reason for the dislike, Doctor D‘s post about Pills and Suspicions deals with the same topic.

I wondered, having no first-hand experience with the situation, if treating drug-seekers like immature toddlers would be effective.  Sure, I’d be happy to write a prescription if that’s what you need.  Let’s talk some more about your symptoms and see what would be the most effective way of treating the problem…  mmmhmm…  It sounds like this would work better for you…

Of course I’m not so naive as to think that would really work on planet earth.  I can’t imagine how doctors can stay nice and helpful when it’s necessary to always be on guard.

Anyone want to move to planet WarmSocks?  On my small planet, there’s only one source for prescriptions.  Anyone caught filling too many prescriptions get shipped back to earth.  Because I’m mighty tired of drug seekers.  I want to be able to discuss pain management options with my doctor without there being any question as to whether I’m looking for narcotics.  It’s not just that I won’t take more pills.  I don’t want the suspicion.

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