Patient Perspective on Refills

Med renewal appointments are supposed to be quick.  How hard can it be to verify that everything is okay, then write a new prescription?

Although I’d love to have my pharmacy fax my doctor about my prescriptions, doctors want to periodically examine the patient before authorizing more refills.  It doesn’t take very long reading medblogs to realize that there’s a reason my doctor won’t okay refills over the phone (or fax).  Maybe something has changed and the dose needs to be tweaked.  Maybe the medicine isn’t effective, so a different one needs to be tried.  Medblogs are great for learning the reasons that doctors offices do some of the things they do.

It’s one thing to read about it in theory, it’s another to experience it.

At a recent appointment, I asked for a renewal on two prescriptions.  Simple, straightforward.  That was the whole purpose of the appointment; I figured it would take five minutes.

One medicine is a headache prophylactic that I’ve taken for three years.  As usual, my doctor asked about headaches.  Normally I say there have been none, then he writes the renewal.  This time, however, I mentioned that I’d been having headaches, but figured out that it was due to the muscle relaxant I’d been taking.  I quit taking it, and have had no headaches since then.

While this was good news in obtaining a renewal on that med, it threw a wrench in the works for the other medicine that I wanted more of.

That second medicine was to treat a rash.  That rash was thought to be from a medication interaction.  If you start taking a new medication and subsequently develop a rash, then it makes sense that the med might have caused the rash (especially when it’s listed as one of the med’s possible side effects).  It also makes sense that discontinuing that med would make the rash go away.  If you discontinue the med, but the rash continues to get worse, then maybe the rash was caused by something else.

I knew that, but I don’t care.   I don’t care what the rash is.  I don’t want to know.  I don’t want to go to more doctor’s appointments.  I don’t want to have more tests.  I don’t want to incur more expense.  I don’t want another diagnosis.  I am done!  All I wanted was for my doctor to write a prescription so I could refill my meds (so that I can have little round scars on my legs instead of ugly bleeding sores).

Apparently, good doctors care what a rash is, even when the patient would rather not know.  I don’t want to go to more doctor’s appointments – but I have a referral and the appointment is already scheduled.  I don’t want to have more tests – but the doctor will probably want to run some.  I don’t want to incur more medical expenses – but all of this is going to cost money.  I don’t want another diagnosis – but it looks like I’ll walk out of there with one anyway.

Last week I checked in at my FP‘s office expecting my doctor to renew two prescriptions in a very quick appointment.  He did write those prescriptions, but that half-hour appointment wasn’t quick.  This is incredibly frustrating.  Request for med renewals aren’t supposed to be snowball appointments.